Originally Posted By buttwyattarchive-deactivated201

theendofaspark:

this is never going to not be funny 

Delivered, as promised.

(via thegreg)

Comments (View)

Philadelphia Eagles: Last season, Chip Kelly disproved the myth that he needs a mobile quarterback to run his offense. Once Michael Vick inevitably went down with injury, Nick Foles was far more efficient, and he even had 17 zone-read runs for 82 yards. (Vick had nine runs for 126 yards). He’s not overly mobile, but he’s not a statue either. An argument could be made that a mobile quarterback would make the offense better, but passing is still the first priority. Foles used the success of the zone read to his advantage with packaged plays involving the play-action passing game. That delayed reaction from the defense watching the mesh point led to numerous big plays for this offense, especially when Foles was healthy in the second half of the season. The Eagles went from using play action on 24 percent of their passes in their first eight games to 39 percent in the final eight games, a period in which Foles averaged 10.2 yards per attempt and threw 12 touchdowns on play-action passes. Only Peyton Manning finished the season with more touchdown passes off play action (17) than Foles’ 15. Defenses may not respect Foles as a runner, but they can’t just crash the mesh point for fear of the play being a pass. (Scott Kacsmar)

Comments (View)

Creative writing should be taught as an art, and as a business. A creative writing program that only includes the former can unwittingly reinforce romantic stereotypes of writing. A young student might major in creative writing. She could become a wonderful poet, and a well-read critic. But she needs to know that poetry doesn’t pay the bills. This is the inside joke of creative writing programs in America. We know creative writing doesn’t make money, and yet we continue to graduate talented writers with no business acumen. At best, it is misguided. At worst, it is fraudulent.

Comments (View)

I love being able to watch live soccer from a different angle than I see on TV. #rbny @newyorkredbulls (at Red Bull Arena)

I love being able to watch live soccer from a different angle than I see on TV. #rbny @newyorkredbulls (at Red Bull Arena)

Comments (View)

"I came out swinging from a South Philly basement caked in stale beer and sweat under half-lit fluorescents."

We all need more punk rock in our lives.

(Source: youtube.com)

Comments (View)
Originally Posted By mar-see-ah

Book are often far more than just books.

Roxane Gay, Bad Feminist (via mar-see-ah)
Comments (View)
Originally Posted By fishingboatproceeds

fishingboatproceeds:

Mario Balotelli is an Italian footballer who may soon become a Liverpool player. He has long been one of my favorite players, and I can’t help but think that the way his reputation in Europe is shaped by race. (Balotelli has been the victim of horrific racist chants throughout his career, but I also think institutional racism shapes media coverage and popular opinion, as pointed out here and elsewhere.)
Balotelli is certainly an unusual footballer: Once, while signing an autograph for a child, Balotelli learned the kid was being bullied, and then drove across town to confront the bully and discuss the matter with the school principal. And he is famed for his generosity, although this is often portrayed popularly as an inability to handle his money well.
He also has a reputation for volatility and immaturity, and is often criticized for getting in fights with teammates. He once threw a dart at a younger player. You hear a lot that Balotelli is crazy and/or lazy. You hear that he stays out late.
Now, I think some of Balotelli’s professional behavior has been poor, and I’m not here to defend it. But look at the way we treat white players:
Liverpool’s Robbie Fowler once PRETENDED TO SNORT THE WHITE POWDER OF THE TOUCH LINE after scoring a goal, in reference to his cocaine use.
Craig Bellamy drunkenly beat a teammate with a golf club. 
Peter Beagrie once drunkenly stole someone’s motorbike and drove it through a hotel’s plate glass window. 
Point being, in all the cases above (and many, many, many more) the offenses were seen as youthful indiscretions, or as hilarious examples of Boys being Boys.
Fowler is now a coach; Beagrie is now a well-respected commentator; and Bellamy is still playing. You rarely hear about his on- and off-field indiscretions, even though they’re probably more numerous than Balotelli’s. Meanwhile, Balotelli makes the news (and gets fined $200,000) for eating curry.
Those of you who follow football will begin to hear a lot about Balotelli if he returns to play in England. You will hear about how he cried after being substituted (although you might not hear that he cried because he had to sit on the bench while racist chants rang through the stadium). You will hear about how he is “wild” and “unpredictable” and “lazy.” 
But watch him play. Watch how good and smart and creative he can be, how he can find paths to goal that make people call him lazy (they called Messi lazy, too, remember) when really he is just waiting, like the chess master who sees four moves ahead. Watch him off the ball, moving to reshape the opposition’s defense.
And then watch him score, turn around unsmiling, and lift his shirt to ask the immense and complicated question.

Sign me up for John Green soccer commentary.

fishingboatproceeds:

Mario Balotelli is an Italian footballer who may soon become a Liverpool player. He has long been one of my favorite players, and I can’t help but think that the way his reputation in Europe is shaped by race. (Balotelli has been the victim of horrific racist chants throughout his career, but I also think institutional racism shapes media coverage and popular opinion, as pointed out here and elsewhere.)

Balotelli is certainly an unusual footballer: Once, while signing an autograph for a child, Balotelli learned the kid was being bullied, and then drove across town to confront the bully and discuss the matter with the school principal. And he is famed for his generosity, although this is often portrayed popularly as an inability to handle his money well.

He also has a reputation for volatility and immaturity, and is often criticized for getting in fights with teammates. He once threw a dart at a younger player. You hear a lot that Balotelli is crazy and/or lazy. You hear that he stays out late.

Now, I think some of Balotelli’s professional behavior has been poor, and I’m not here to defend it. But look at the way we treat white players:

Liverpool’s Robbie Fowler once PRETENDED TO SNORT THE WHITE POWDER OF THE TOUCH LINE after scoring a goal, in reference to his cocaine use.

Craig Bellamy drunkenly beat a teammate with a golf club

Peter Beagrie once drunkenly stole someone’s motorbike and drove it through a hotel’s plate glass window

Point being, in all the cases above (and many, many, many more) the offenses were seen as youthful indiscretions, or as hilarious examples of Boys being Boys.

Fowler is now a coach; Beagrie is now a well-respected commentator; and Bellamy is still playing. You rarely hear about his on- and off-field indiscretions, even though they’re probably more numerous than Balotelli’s. Meanwhile, Balotelli makes the news (and gets fined $200,000) for eating curry.

Those of you who follow football will begin to hear a lot about Balotelli if he returns to play in England. You will hear about how he cried after being substituted (although you might not hear that he cried because he had to sit on the bench while racist chants rang through the stadium). You will hear about how he is “wild” and “unpredictable” and “lazy.” 

But watch him play. Watch how good and smart and creative he can be, how he can find paths to goal that make people call him lazy (they called Messi lazy, too, remember) when really he is just waiting, like the chess master who sees four moves ahead. Watch him off the ball, moving to reshape the opposition’s defense.

And then watch him score, turn around unsmiling, and lift his shirt to ask the immense and complicated question.

Sign me up for John Green soccer commentary.

Comments (View)

#tbt to last Sunday on the Tilt-A-Whirl in #ocnj with the family.  (at Playland Castaway Cove)

#tbt to last Sunday on the Tilt-A-Whirl in #ocnj with the family. (at Playland Castaway Cove)

Comments (View)

(DC + Labor Day) - Place to Stay = Us

Friend’s place fell through. Anyone interested in hosting my wife and me over Labor Day in DC?

Comments (View)
Originally Posted By marylovesbooks

harperperennial:

marylovesbooks:

My problem isn’t that I don’t want to read the books I already own, it’s that they keep releasing new books.

Sorry.

Comments (View)
Originally Posted By tastefullyoffensive

gerrycanavan:

so i was watching the news the other day
tastefullyoffensive:

[cyanide&happiness]

gerrycanavan:

so i was watching the news the other day

tastefullyoffensive:

[cyanide&happiness]

Comments (View)

For a club that hasn’t enjoyed much on-field success, the goal is to get smarter, become a consistent contender, and to achieve excellence in all areas by taking advantage of the club’s biggest assets — its gem of a 25,000-seat stadium, the best building in MLS; a year-old, all-world training facility in Hanover, N.J., that houses one of the league’s strongest academy programs; and its almost two-decade head start in the New York-New Jersey area.

Comments (View)
Originally Posted By embraceyourboing

"So many of us choose our path out of fear disguised as practicality"

(Source: embraceyourboing, via barelysarcasm)

Comments (View)
Originally Posted By luke-h

fred-wilson:

reblog of the week goes to Luke

luke-h:

On The Rocks - The RAA - Mended With Gold

2nd track from their upcoming release.  I expect to be spending a lot of quality time with it once Sep 30th rolls around.

Huge fan of RAA. They always do the best live shows.

Comments (View)
Originally Posted By tastefullyoffensive

Comments (View)

Copyright © 2007 - 2014   Peter W. Knox