National Defense - The New Yorker
In light of this news that Tim Howard is writing a book (yay!) here’s his amazing story in this well written 2010 New Yorker profile.

National Defense - The New Yorker

In light of this news that Tim Howard is writing a book (yay!) here’s his amazing story in this well written 2010 New Yorker profile.

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No one ever talks about how identifying with something you read might not always be a good thing. Saying “that’s like me” is not always an affirmation — it can be terrifying and make you feel “more fucked-up and Unknown.” Critics and fans alike rhapsodize about identifying with David Foster Wallace’s writing as though it can only be consoling and empowering, and I used to think so too, until I got too close and discovered what may be the most important truth about literature, the true “aesthetic benefit of close reading,” though I doubt the Mellon Foundation would be all that interested in hearing about my discovery, as it is beneficial only in the most cautionary of senses: there is such a thing as reading too closely.

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There’s documentation for this. The Andrew Mellon Foundation granted me a fellowship (and a private office) for a proposal entitled “Reading Wallace Reading: David Foster Wallace’s Glosses and the Aesthetic Benefits of Close Reading.” While this may threaten to sound impressive, both the proposal’s title and its contents are in reality complete and utter bullshit. There is nothing academic about my reasons for being here; I am in Austin always and only as a fan. Mere fandom, however, is not enough to convince your wife to allow you to leave her and your two toddlers behind in the mild climes of Los Angeles so that you can jaunt to the burning pit of Hell that is Austin during the drought of 2011 just to pore over the marginalia of a major American writer you’re obsessed with. Phrasing it like that makes you sound irresponsible and selfish, but when you call yourself a Ransom Center Fellow and you flash some Mellon Foundation coin, you’ve got academic immunity and are more or less free from all other obligations.

If all this sounds a bit strange, let me try to contextualize this: apart from one of his sweat-soaked bandanas or used chewing tobacco, David Foster Wallace’s annotations are probably about as sacred to his fans as a piece of the True Cross is to Christians. No Wallace fan could resist an opportunity, especially a subsidized opportunity, to touch the literary equivalent of a medieval holy relic.

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Originally Posted By spiritsflame

sentientarboroform:

spiritsflame:

If whats happening in Ferguson was happening to an all white community, it would be called a dystopian novel

#and all actions against the police would be heroic and daring#and the plucky white protags would be encouraged to use violence to stop the injustice

(via think4yourself)

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Originally Posted By superpunch2

tssfxx:

helllotittys:

have—not:

i love this photo because at first you think that she was going to get married but instead her husband to be left her, or something like that. but actually its quite the opposite. i clicked on the source and it brought me to an article explaining the story behind this photo, and shes not crying, shes hungover. her and her husband went to a football game on their wedding day, and got extremely drunk and partied all night. they took the subway home because they couldn’t drive. so no, its not a sad heartbreaking story, its a crazy joyful one. which in my opinion makes the picture even more amazing.


CAN PEOPLE PLEASE REBLOG THE PIC WITH THIS CAPTION^ AND NOT THE ONE WHERE EVERYONE IS SAD AND ARE LIKE “POOR GIRL GOD BLESS”

Did their football team win?

tssfxx:

helllotittys:

have—not:

i love this photo because at first you think that she was going to get married but instead her husband to be left her, or something like that. but actually its quite the opposite. i clicked on the source and it brought me to an article explaining the story behind this photo, and shes not crying, shes hungover. her and her husband went to a football game on their wedding day, and got extremely drunk and partied all night. they took the subway home because they couldn’t drive. so no, its not a sad heartbreaking story, its a crazy joyful one. which in my opinion makes the picture even more amazing.

CAN PEOPLE PLEASE REBLOG THE PIC WITH THIS CAPTION^ AND NOT THE ONE WHERE EVERYONE IS SAD AND ARE LIKE “POOR GIRL GOD BLESS”

Did their football team win?

(via ronenreblogs)

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I then had my wife listen to the same headphones without telling her my thoughts, and she came to almost all of the same conclusions, so I know that either I’m not nuts or both of us are.

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It’d be easy to dismiss this as a company line if it wasn’t supported by the numbers. According to the MLS, the average MLS attendance is 18,958. Sporting KC, per the blog MLSattendance, has an average of 20,160, and sports the league’s third-highest percentage of listed capacity at 109 percent. They’ve sold out over 40 straight games and have a 1,000-person waiting list for season tickets. One staffer told me that their season-ticket renewal rate is at a record high.

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Originally Posted By therealmardallie

therealmardallie:

Why do I check Twitter before bed? It only makes me angry.

Sigh. Police can’t police themselves.

therealmardallie:

Why do I check Twitter before bed? It only makes me angry.

Sigh. Police can’t police themselves.

(via jstrowrites)

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Some said that he must immediately be released from jail. Stealing cheese and bacon are not serious crimes. The man was apparently never violent. He didn’t carry a weapon. He’s an introvert, not a criminal. He clearly has no desire to be a part of our world. Let’s open a Kickstarter, get him enough cash for a few years’ worth of groceries, and allow him to go back to the woods. Some people were willing to let him live on their land, rent-free. Others countered that it wasn’t the physical items he robbed that made his crimes so disturbing—he stole hundreds of people’s peace of mind. Their sense of security. How were they supposed to know Knight wasn’t armed and dangerous? Even a single break-in can be punishable by a ten-year sentence. If Knight really wanted to live in the woods, he should’ve done so on public lands, hunting and fishing for food. He’s nothing but a lazy man and a thief times a thousand. Lock him up in the state penitentiary.

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I started this review by saying that I was totally biased, and I am, but believe the 5-star rating when you see it: I gave my wife’s last book 4-stars.

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Originally Posted By buttwyattarchive-deactivated201

theendofaspark:

this is never going to not be funny 

Delivered, as promised.

(via thegreg)

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Philadelphia Eagles: Last season, Chip Kelly disproved the myth that he needs a mobile quarterback to run his offense. Once Michael Vick inevitably went down with injury, Nick Foles was far more efficient, and he even had 17 zone-read runs for 82 yards. (Vick had nine runs for 126 yards). He’s not overly mobile, but he’s not a statue either. An argument could be made that a mobile quarterback would make the offense better, but passing is still the first priority. Foles used the success of the zone read to his advantage with packaged plays involving the play-action passing game. That delayed reaction from the defense watching the mesh point led to numerous big plays for this offense, especially when Foles was healthy in the second half of the season. The Eagles went from using play action on 24 percent of their passes in their first eight games to 39 percent in the final eight games, a period in which Foles averaged 10.2 yards per attempt and threw 12 touchdowns on play-action passes. Only Peyton Manning finished the season with more touchdown passes off play action (17) than Foles’ 15. Defenses may not respect Foles as a runner, but they can’t just crash the mesh point for fear of the play being a pass. (Scott Kacsmar)

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Creative writing should be taught as an art, and as a business. A creative writing program that only includes the former can unwittingly reinforce romantic stereotypes of writing. A young student might major in creative writing. She could become a wonderful poet, and a well-read critic. But she needs to know that poetry doesn’t pay the bills. This is the inside joke of creative writing programs in America. We know creative writing doesn’t make money, and yet we continue to graduate talented writers with no business acumen. At best, it is misguided. At worst, it is fraudulent.

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